Strong focus on violence reduction and rehabilitation at Warwickshire prison

  • 21 Aug 2018 13:30

In a report out today, the Independent Monitoring Board at G4S-managed HM Prison Rye Hill said that there was a strong focus on violence reduction and rehabilitation across the prison. 

Rye Hill, prison, garden

In a report out today, the Independent Monitoring Board at G4S-managed HM Prison Rye Hill said that there was a strong focus on violence reduction and rehabilitation across the prison.

The Independent Monitoring Board (IMB),  a group of lay people who observe the prison and scrutinise records and data, making informal contact with the prisoners and staff, have published their annual review of the Warwickshire prison. The category B prison has an operational capacity of 663 adult male prisoners serving four years or more for sexual offences. 

In today’s report, monitors stated that the focus on violence reduction across the prison was paying dividends, with a downward trend in the number of incidents evident over the course of the year. Monitors praised the prison’s handling of the significant number of bed watches and terminally ill prisoners. 

 
Today’s report is a testament to the hard work the whole team have put in over the past year to tackle violence and support the men in our care at Rye Hill. 
Lee Davies DEPUTY DIRECTOR, HM PRISON RYE HILL

Monitors reported that the prison was developing plans to implement new training programmes and create an atmosphere at the prison focused on rehabilitation. Described as a ‘major change’, monitors said that while there was some reluctance from prisoners to take part, there was already success in peer-group networks and ways to involve prisoners’ families in their rehabilitation were also being explored. 

Deputy Director at HM Prison Rye Hill, Lee Davies, said:

“Today’s report is a testament to the hard work the whole team have put in over the past year to tackle violence and support the men in our care at Rye Hill. 

Recent changes in admissions procedures, including a renovated admissions centre and revised ‘Early Days in Prison’ programme, aim to establish a sense of community from the start and have already made a positive impact within the population. 

“The prison population at Rye Hill has changed significantly over the past couple of years and has a much greater demand for medical care. I’m pleased to see monitors recognise our efforts to adapt to this change, and we are working closely with our healthcare colleagues to make sure we provide support for the men in our care.” 

 
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