Inspectors says Tinsley House is a 'calm and safe environment' 

  • 30 Aug 2018 10:00

Inspection reports into the G4S-managed Tinsley House immigration removal centre and pre-departure accommodation have today been published by HM Inspectorate of Prisons

G4S Tinsley House IRC

Inspection reports into the G4S-managed Tinsley House immigration removal centre and pre-departure accommodation have today been published by HM Inspectorate of Prisons.

In the report on the centre, inspectors commended the excellent support provided by the accredited Welfare team, as well as the calm and safe environment at Tinsley House.

Inspectors also highlighted the committed work by the team at the pre-departure accommodation to create a welcoming and supportive environment for the families there, which was recently praised in the Shaw Report. 
 
The report shows that while we do have improvements to make around diversity monitoring and promotion, and extending, the use of the cultural kitchen, we can be proud of the work that we are doing to ensure that the detainees at Tinsley House are well cared for and supported, prior to their resettlement. 
Sarah Newland  Head of Tinsley House immigration removal centre, pre-departure accommodation and Borders

Inspectors were concerned to find that a small minority of staff did not feel confident reporting safeguarding concerns through the G4S whistleblowing system – SpeakOut. The senior managers at the centre have worked hard over the past year to promote the whistleblowing system through visual reminders across the centre and including it within the Initial Training Course and follow up training for all members of staff.

In addition to the SpeakOut service, all staff have access to the confidential security information report process which enables them to raise anonymous concerns about the safety and security of the centre. The system is well used and provides useful intelligence which aids our investigations.

Tinsley House operates an open and relaxed regime and any detainees not adhering to the expected standards of behaviour may be transferred to an alternative IRC.  . Senior managers are investigating claims by the inspectors that staff “threatened” detainees with transfers as behavioural management techniques must be carried out with care and respect.  

Restrictions in movement were also mentioned by the inspector. Changes to the regime were made when Tinsley House re-opened following refurbishment in May 2017 following recommendations by the Home Office.

Head of Tinsley House immigration removal centre, pre-departure accommodation and Borders, Sarah Newland, said: 

“The report shows that while we do have improvements to make around diversity monitoring and promotion, and extending, the use of the cultural kitchen, we can be proud of the work that we are doing to ensure that the detainees at Tinsley House are well cared for and supported, prior to their resettlement. 

“The change to our roll count procedure enables us to check on the welfare of all of our detainees which also helps to foster better relationships between staff and the men in our care. 

“As part of our plan to respond to the recommendations made by the inspectors, we have already broadened the discussion points of our monthly consultative meetings with detainees, as well as through our anonymous safer community survey.  In addition improvements are already underway in the management of adult risks and use of force reviews. 

“It is a real testament to our dedicated team that inspectors were positive about the PDA, which relocated to Tinsley House following the closure of Cedars in 2017, and in their report recognised the efforts of the staff who work with very vulnerable families and children.”
 
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